Episode 21 – The Good Friends share yet more blasphemous knowledge

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coc-7th

This week’s episode demonstrates that we haven’t run out of things to say about magic in Call of Cthulhu. Really, this is the episode we should have started with, as it is an in-depth discussion of the magic rules in 7th edition. Maybe we should try some of this magic stuff for real to see if we can send it back in time.

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Whoops!

We also go on about the use of magic in Call of Cthulhu games, including whether investigators should use spells habitually and how well the game reflects the source material. You will be shocked to hear that we have opinions, often strong and divergent.

This is the last episode in which we'll go on about Attract Fish. Probably. Sorry, Bret!

This is the last episode in which we’ll mention A*****t F**h. Probably. Sorry, Bret!

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6 Responses to Episode 21 – The Good Friends share yet more blasphemous knowledge

  1. the episode isn’t showing up in my podcast reader on the iPhone, fyi

  2. Thanks for pointing that out, Bret! I’d forgotten to tick the box to add it tot he correct category. It should replicate soon.

  3. raildave says:

    I always like the episodes where you all are having a go at one another. Makes for good listening. But…I would love to know what was censored? And then again…why was there censoring in this episode?

  4. David — That was Paul tiring of our running joke about Attract Fish. He has declared that he will bleep any mention of A*****t F**h from now on.

    Damn! It’s even started affecting the text on the site

    Oh, and you can expect us to continue having a go at each other. It’s our main mode of communication!

  5. RogerBW says:

    Hah, raildave, Scott is simply fobbing you off because he thinks you aren’t ready for the real power. Come back when you’ve been raised to the 8th level.

  6. I think the model for Chaosium’s tome reading rules is Professor Armitage’s reading of Wilbur Whateley’s diary. Considering he is A) decrypting the text B) reading the handwriting of a lunatic autodidactic inhuman cultist, you can see why this takes a while.
    While I don’t think it should take 6 weeks to read “The King in Yellow”, I do think some books should take quite a while. Handwritten works, even those done by a scribe, can take quite a while to suss out, due to vagaries of script and quality of hand. Drawing out the deeper truths of some texts – figuring what, exactly “the copper from above” means for example – should also take a while. It sounds like the new system offers multiple options. (I included alternate tome reading rules in the Masks Companion btw, so I’ve been thinking about this a while…)

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