Episode 61 – The Good Friends hit the books, and find some hit back

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Episode061

We’re back, and we’re watching horror films about books. We don’t mean films based on books (although one is, just to confuse things), but films where a book plays a central role. In fact, you could argue that the books in question are characters and not mere plot devices. Wooden performances are easier to forgive when you’re largely made of wood pulp.

NinthGate

If you flick the pages just right, you can hear a distinct “Whoa”.

Our two choices are The Ninth Gate  (1999) and Maléfique (2002). We didn’t mean to review another Polanski film so soon after our dust-up over Repulsion in episode 51, but the Devil made us do it. Predictably, we disagree completely about the film’s merits once again, although this time the tables are turned.

malefique

“That got a bit heated!”

Our discussion takes in some other French horror films that followed in the wake of Maléfique, including High Tension/Switchblade Romance, InsideFrontière(s), Martyrs and Livid. We end, as ever, with a look at what elements we can steal for use in our games.

malefique_2002

“Attract Fish? Should be safe enough…”

In the introduction, we discuss getting ready for the Concrete Cow convention in Milton Keynes. True to form, we weren’t organised enough to do this in an episode that would come out before the convention. The good news is that you don’t have long to wait until the next one. Concrete Cow 16 takes place on the 12th of March 2016, and it will be the convention’s 10th birthday celebration. There will be cake. And games. And cows. Well, maybe not cows.

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Not pictured: Scott or Matt doing rude things.

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3 Responses to Episode 61 – The Good Friends hit the books, and find some hit back

  1. Elina says:

    Great podcast!

    “Tome” (“τόμος” in Greek) is derived from the Greek word “τομή” which means incision or cut. It refers to a book that because of its size is cut in several volumes when published. In Greek The same word τόμος also stands for “volume” (ie volume I of a book).

    Contrast tο “άτομος”, that which cannot be cut, ie atom.

  2. Pingback: The Good Friends of Jackson Elias, Cthulhu Podcast ep.61 | RPG Blast – All the latest RPG releases!

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